Vitamin D & Vitamin K - Your combination for healthy and strong bones and much more

Vitamin D & Vitamin K - Your combination for healthy and strong bones and much more



Vitamin D and vitamin K are often combined in dietary supplements. In our article, we look at both vitamins individually and explain why they are often combined and what benefits can be derived.

 

Vitamin D

 

Vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin, is an important nutrient that plays a crucial role in maintaining optimal health. While many people associate vitamin D with healthy bones and teeth, this nutrient is involved in several bodily functions, including regulation of the immune system, and cell growth. In this blog post, we'll go over the importance of vitamin D, its sources, and its benefits.

 

Vitamin K

 

Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a critical role in blood clotting and bone health. It is found in two main forms: Vitamin K1 and Vitamin K2. 

 

Vitamin K1 is found in green leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale and broccoli, and in vegetable oils such as soybean and canola oil. Vitamin K2 is produced by bacteria in the intestines and is also found in fermented foods such as cheese and natto.

 

Effects of vitamin D

 

Cellular health

 

A certain enzyme is produced in the adrenal gland that regulates neurotransmitters such as dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline. Your vitality, mood and also stress management are affected by these hormones. With a normal vitamin D level, the enzyme is produced properly and everything is in the green zone. In case of a deficiency, however, the adrenal gland secretes more of an enzyme, which can cause fatigue or exhaustion.

 

Muscle function

 

Vitamin D is also important for your muscles. It affects your performance and muscles at a cellular level. In addition, vitamin D is said to have a positive effect on your mitochondria, or cellular power plants. If you want to perform at your best, a good vitamin D level can help you do so.

 

Support of the immune system

 

Vitamin D plays an important role in regulating the immune system, helping it fight off infection and disease. Many key functions of the immune system are dependent on or even controlled by vitamin D. On the one hand, it promotes the production of certain immune cells and defense substances, but it also curbs inflammatory immune reactions. Vitamin D thus supports a positive, healthy immune response and at the same time prevents a defense reaction from turning against the body's own cells.

 

Bone health

 

Vitamin D is important for the absorption and metabolism of calcium, which is critical for healthy bones and teeth. This nutrient helps maintain the balance of calcium and phosphorus in the body, which is necessary for bone formation, growth and remodeling. Vitamin D also promotes the absorption of magnesium, another mineral important for bone health.

 

Effects of vitamin K

 

Blood clotting

 

One of the most important roles of vitamin K is blood clotting. In the case of a cut or injury that causes bleeding, the body must form a blood clot to stop the bleeding. Vitamin K helps the process of blood clotting by activating proteins called clotting factors that help form the clot.

 

Without enough vitamin K, your blood may not clot properly, resulting in excessive bleeding or bruising. For this reason, vitamin K is sometimes given to newborns who have low vitamin K levels and are at increased risk for bleeding.

 

Bone health

 

Vitamin K also plays a role in bone health. It helps activate a protein called osteocalcin, which is important for bone formation. Studies have shown that people with low levels of vitamin K are at higher risk for osteoporosis and bone fractures.

 

Other health benefits

 

In addition to blood clotting and bone health, vitamin K may have other health benefits. Some studies suggest that it may help reduce the risk of heart disease, improve insulin sensitivity, and even have anti-cancer properties.

 

However, more research is needed to fully understand these potential benefits and determine how much vitamin K is needed to achieve them.

 

Sources of vitamin D

 

The main source of vitamin D is sunlight. When the skin is exposed to sunlight, it produces vitamin D3, also known as cholecalciferol. However, the amount of vitamin D the skin can produce depends on several factors, including time of day, season, latitude, and skin color. For example, people who live in regions with low sunlight exposure, such as northern latitudes, may not be able to make enough vitamin D from sunlight alone.

 

In addition to sunlight, vitamin D can also be obtained from food. Fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel, as well as cod liver oil, are good sources of vitamin D. Some foods such as milk, cereals and orange juice are also fortified with vitamin D. However, it is difficult to get enough vitamin D from food alone, so sun exposure is crucial.

 

Sources of vitamin K

 

Vitamin K1 is found in green leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale and broccoli, and in vegetable oils such as soybean and canola oil. Vitamin K2 is produced by bacteria in the gut and is also found in fermented foods such as cheese and natto.

 

Vitamin D and vitamin K as a power duo

 

It is important to understand why when taking vitamin D, it is also important to ensure a good vitamin K level. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin, meaning it requires dietary fat to be absorbed and utilized by the body. Vitamin K, on the other hand, is a fat-soluble vitamin that helps with blood clotting and bone metabolism. These two vitamins work together in a delicate balance to maintain optimal health.

 

When vitamin D is not available in sufficient vitamin K in the body, there is a risk of calcium buildup in the arteries, which can lead to cardiovascular disease. Vitamin D increases calcium absorption in the intestines, and if there is no vitamin K to carry the calcium to the bones, it can be deposited in the soft tissues and arteries.

 

If both nutrients are present in adequate amounts, they can improve bone health through this mechanism. This can help improve bone density and reduce the risk of fractures.